Category Creative Historical Thinking

Space-time visualizations without a flux capacitor

I’m on tour at various regional colleges, giving presentations about my new book, Creative Historical Thinking. I try to make these presentations interactive, with a number of historical thinking exercises for the audience. One point I have been consistently trying to make is that the ways we conceive of time can fundamentally differ from one […]

Time, where did you come from, where did you go?

Time flows up and down, or in a circle (a nautilus perhaps); it flows from left to right. Where time comes from, and where it goes, depends on the observer. Every time I present my work on spatial conceptions of time, I ask students to draw their own examples. Not everyone has an image that […]

The Weekly Pill Planner: Design and the Importance of Spatial Views of Time

I’ve been writing about all of the interesting ways in which people visualize time in spatial form: images of the day, the week, the month, the year, and story lines. I think that spatial visualizations of time help with memory, and that they help make us better at remembering the past and preparing for the […]

A Few More Space-Time Visualizations

Space-time synesthesia, a topic that I have explored in my new book Creative Historical Thinking (Routledge, 2018), is the idea that some people reflexively think of time in spatial form. How they do so, however, differs from person to person. Exploring this idea, I have been asking classrooms of college students to days their views […]

Aerial Photographs of my house

In my new book, Creative Historical Thinking, I have a chapter about the history of my house, and all of the different creative ways you can use to learn more about your property. I end the chapter by saying that I don’t know what I will discover next, nor how I will learn more about […]

Alumni Feature (Hope College)

I am featured on the website of my alma mater’s history department. Here.

2-part Interview about my New Book

Last week I visited my friend Anthony Comegna at the CATO Institute to talk about my new book, Creative Historical Thinking.  Apparently the original stock of the book is sold out, so they are printing more. I don’t know if that means they sold 5, 50, or 150 copies. I’m pretty happy with how the […]

The Shame of Forgetting Maurice Mandelbaum

While most historians have never heard of him, Maurice Mandelbaum, a philosophy professor at Darmouth University, was the founding father of the analytic philosophy of history.  When Mandelbaum launched his professional career in the 1930s, the “philosophy of history” meant essentially what we would today call “speculative history”, that is, grand theorizing about the ultimate […]

Assignments to turn students into historians

As a college student, I wrote a lot of history research papers. Research and writing are two essential tasks of a historian. However, when a class is only 15 weeks long, and when students are being introduced to a topic for the first time, it seems unfair and unproductive to assign them a 15 to […]

Counting pounds, shillings, and pence

I came across this back-of-the-page sketching in an 18th century collection the other day.  It is simple addition of sums in pounds, shillings, and pence.